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      911 tapes from Alexandra Kogut murder released

      <font size="2">Clayton Whittemore</font>

      For the first time, we are hearing from the man accused of beating his girlfriend to death.

      In 911 tapes just released, Clayton Whittemore talks to dispatchers in the hours after he is accused of beating Alexandra Kogut to death. It is a rare look inside what unfolded that day back in 2012. We want to warn you, some of you may find these calls disturbing.

      They are calls never heard publicly before, a glimpse inside the hours after a New Hartford woman was murdered as investigators work to track down the man who did it. The first call comes from Whittemore's father, giving investigators their first clue that something is terribly wrong. "My name is Scott Whittemore. I'm at work and my son Clayton, a teenager, 21-years-old, just called and told me he killed someone."

      Later, dispatchers hear from Clayton Whittemore himself, calling them from the DeWitt rest stop on the Thruway to turn himself in. "I did something bad that I can't take back and I've gotta turn myself in."

      Just hours earlier, around 3 a.m., Kogut's lifeless body was found in her dorm room with extensive trauma to her upper body. Whittemore later told police he and Kogut were arguing inside her freshman dorm room at SUNY Brockport. That's when, he says, he snapped, beating her to death with his hands and a curling iron.

      On the tapes, Whittemore doesn't tell the dispatcher what he did, but admits he did something wrong and questions what will happen to him next. Whittemore says: "If you want the death penalty, can you ask for it? Dispatcher says: "I have no idea man. I have no idea to tell the truth." Dispatcher says: "Why would you need something like that?" Whittemore says: "Because that's what I did. I don't deserve to live."

      Whittemore is charged with murder in Kogut's death. Prosecutors are still waiting for results of a psychological evaluation to see whether he is competent to stand trial. For now, the trial is scheduled to begin next month.