67
      Sunday
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      Monday
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      Tuesday
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      Baby Easton travels to special Epidermolysis Bullosa Center in Ohio

      Baby Easton, in stroller and under blanket, about to board flight to special EB clinic in Ohio.
      Baby Easton Friedel traveled Wednesday to the Epidermolysis Bullosa Center at Cincinnati Children's Hospital for a round of doctor appointments.

      The special medical flight is the only way Easton could possibly travel to Ohio. The trip is courtesy of Patient Airlift Services (PALS), which is a chairty network of pilots who donate their time and aircraft.

      "It's great, they are all volunteers and we are so very, very grateful for them," says Easton's mother, Danielle Friedel.

      PALS pilot Pete Welles was the captain of Baby Easton's flight. He and his wife flew their small plane up from Baltimore Wednesday morning to make the trip from Syracuse to Cincinatti. Welles runs an investment company and has been flying for 50 years.

      On the tarmac outside Landmark Aviation, Welles told CNY Central's Michael Benny, "Since we are fortunate enough to have what we have, we have to give back; that is how we feel about it."

      The EB Center at Cincinnati Children's Hospital is one of the few in the country that provide care for Easton's rare skin condition.

      "There's a bunch of other families there who have children with EB, so it is really great for us as a new family with EB, we can look to them for support and get some questions answered," Danielle Friedel said.

      Baby Easton Friedel was released from the hospital Monday after spending the weekend in the hospital for a bulging soft spot, atrophy on his brain, and a positive staph test over the weekend.

      A benefit for Baby Easton raised more than $3,000 for Baby Easton's medical bills onSunday afternoon at The Ancient Order of Hibernians in Auburn.

      Baby Easton was born in August of 2012 with skin missing from some areas and blisters in other areas, a rare condition called Epidermolysis Bullosa or EB. There is no cure for this genetic disease and it turns up in only about 1 in every 50,000 live births. There was no known history of EB in Baby Easton's family. Baby Easton's parents, Danielle and Jared Friedel, have three other sons and they do not have EB. Read more about Baby Eason .