71
      Sunday
      83 / 64
      Monday
      85 / 66
      Tuesday
      86 / 68

      Flooding victims can start applying for state aid for uninsured losses

      Victims of flooding in New York's Mohawk Valley can apply for state help at several locations over the next few days.

      Gov. Andrew Cuomo says "flood assistance teams" will be available Monday and Tuesday in Oneida, Herkimer, Madison and Montgomery counties, all hard hit by last month's rains.

      They'll be at the New Hartford Volunteer Fire Department, Herkimer County Community College, the Oneida Recreation Center and the Fort Plain Senior Center.

      New York State is giving five counties 16 million dollars in aid. Montgomery, Niagara, Oneida, Herkimer and Madison counties are able to receive part of the 16 million each.

      Farmers, small business owners, renters and homeowners can apply either in person or online at www.nyshcr.org/Programs/NYS-Flood

      The Recreation Center in Oneida will be open from 11:00am through 8:00pm Monday and Tuesday to accept written applications for aid for the affected counties.

      You can apply until August 30th at 4pm.

      Farmers and business owners are able to receive up to $50,000. Renters and Homeowners and able to receive up to $31,900. Business owners which operate out of their home apply as a homeowner or renter.

      Vital items are being replaced for homeowners, the include drywall, insulation and windows. Sheds, pools and hot tubs are not.

      Some items renters are able to receive aid for cell phones, tables and sofa's up to 8 feet long.

      This money is on a first come first serve basis.

      More information and application forms will be available at the state office of Homes and Community Renewal website.

      H elp is coming to neighbors who need it most. For neighbors like Saletta Barker, the flooding turned her house in Oneida into a shell of what it once was.

      "I don't want to lose what I've worked for, for me and my family," says Barker. "I am staying at my house, that's uninhabitable. That's where I stand."

      Those concerns may soon be put to rest if they receive the state aid they were out applying for today, aid that they say they so desperately need.

      "I am worried about the furnace, because in three months I got no walls, so I just installed my furnace in October, so now I don't have a furnace. What do I do in three months if I can't... When it gets a little chillier at night," says Barker. "

      "It's really good since we're all up to our necks in bills, you know, having to replace furnaces and things like that, furniture that we all lost. It's gonna be a big help," says Gisela Campanie who was also out today applying for aid.

      After turning in applications, state inspectors will come survey the damage, before providing much needed money and answers.

      "That's what I need is the answers I need, so I know where I stand. Whether I am going to lose my house or have a place to go home to," says Barker.

      H elp is coming to neighbors who need it most. For neighbors like Saletta Barker, the flooding turned her house in Oneida into a shell of what it once was.

      "I don't want to lose what I've worked for, for me and my family," says Barker. "I am staying at my house, that's uninhabitable. That's where I stand."

      Those concerns may soon be put to rest if they receive the state aid they were out applying for today, aid that they say they so desperately need.

      "I am worried about the furnace, because in three months I got no walls, so I just installed my furnace in October, so now I don't have a furnace. What do I do in three months if I can't... When it gets a little chillier at night," says Barker. "

      "It's really good since we're all up to our necks in bills, you know, having to replace furnaces and things like that, furniture that we all lost. It's gonna be a big help," says Gisela Campanie who was also out today applying for aid.

      After turning in applications, the state says they will be in touch within 2 or 3 days. Inspectors will come survey the damage, before providing much needed money through checks and answers.

      "That's what I need is the answers I need, so I know where I stand. Whether I am going to lose my house or have a place to go home to," says Barker.