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      Fort Drum soldier and Albany native killed in Afghanistan

      Maj. Jaimie E. Leonard

      Two of the three Americans killed in an insider attack in Afghanistan over the weekend were from upstate New York

      Relatives and friends of Lt. Colonel Todd Clark tell Albany-area media that he was killed Saturday by an Afghan soldier he was training. The 40-year-old Albany native served in the Army's 10th Mountain Division based at Fort Drum in northern New York. His survivors include his wife and two children.

      The Times Union of Albany reports that those confirming Clarks's death include his father, Jack Clark, a retired Army colonel.

      The Department of Defense announced his death on Tuesday. The DOD says Clark died from injuries suffered from small arms fire at Zarghun Shahr, Afghanistan.

      Clark joined the Army in 1995 and arrived at Fort Drum in 2009. He deployed to Bosnia in 1999, Kuwait in 2003, Iraq in 2003, 2006 and 2009 and Afghanistan in 2010 and 2013.

      His awards include three Bronze Stars, the Purple Heart, and two Meritorious Service Medals, among many others.

      Clark is survived by his wife, two children, mother and father.

      WNYT-TV reports that the other New Yorker killed was Joseph Morabito of Hunter in Greene County. Morabito would have turned 55 Monday. His wife tells the station her husband was a civilian law enforcement professional.

      The DOD also reported the death of Maj. Jaimie E. Leonard, 39, of Warrick, on Tuesday. She was an Intelligence Officer and served in the Army's 10th Mountain Division at Form Drum. She died from injuries suffered from small arms fire at Zarghun Shahr.

      Leonard graduated from West Point and joined the Army in 1997. She arrived at Fort Drum in 2010. She deployed to Bosnia in 1999, to Iraq in 2005 and to Afghanistan in 2011 and 2013.

      Leonard's awards include two Bronze Stars, two Meritorious Service Medals, and the Joint Service Commendation Medal, among others.

      She is survived by five siblings.

      Clark and Leonard were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom, according to the DOD.