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      How would you like to work inside where it's more than 100 degrees?

      A Mark's Pizzeria employee takes a pie out of the oven Thursday afternoon. / photo: Craig McDowell

      How would you like to work in a job where you know it's going to be hot, and there's not much you can do about it? Now how about trying to do your job on a record-breaking 100 degree day?

      By Thursday afternoon, most of the employees at Patrick's Cleaners in Westvale had left for the day. Outside, the temperature was in the 90s, and inside it was even hotter. In the area where the dry cleaning is done, they can't use air conditioners because it heats up so fast. Instead they have to use ventilation systems and when the heat gets too unbearable, there's no choice but to leave.

      "When it gets so hot we try to get ahead," says owner Wayne Beecher. "If it's a stretch of hot weather like this, it's hard to stay ahead and our work comes in everyday, we have to process it. We start early and try to finish before the real heat of the day."

      Workers came in at 5:00 a.m. Thursday instead of the normal 7:00 a.m. start time. Beecher says workers always know if the heat is ever bothering them, they can stop. He is hoping the temperature comes down so that business will go back up.

      "It's tough on everybody, everybody is looking to stay in air conditioning and get out of work and go home," he said.

      Working in hot temperatures is something the folks at Mark's Pizzeria in Syracuse's Shop City plaza do everyday. It's more difficult when temperature outside is scorching. They do have air conditioning but the ovens are very warm.

      "It's so warm," says manager Matt Winters. "The ovens are almost 500 degrees, we're usually running two of them at night. The fryers are 400 degrees a piece. It doesn't really help."

      Workers can wear shorts and there's a walk in cooler for "relief".

      While they may be sweating, business is still good.

      "No one really wants to cook," Winters said. "They come in, they get food, they go back to their nice air conditioned house and they eat."