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      Hundreds cross their finish line at the Boston Strong Run

      O ne local runner's desire to pay tribute to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings turned into an event that brought hundreds of runners to Onondaga Lake Park tonight. The Boston Strong Run started online with a blogger in California after the bombings last Monday. Twitter, Pinterest and Facebook have all helped to rapidly grow the community since then to include 100 cities running today across the country, including Syracuse.

      Susan Brilla saw this movement and decided to hit the web on Facebook to bring these hundreds of runners together. "You just kind of thought that it was an attack against your friends," says Brilla. "I am completely flabbergasted. I thought this was going to be a run with 20 of my friends. I really didn't expect it to be like this."

      Kristin MacDonald normally sports the interlocking midnight blue and white Yankees cap, but at tonight's run she was showing off her new hat to honor those who were lost and injured. "You mentioned the hat, normally it's a Yankees, but now I'm a Boston fan. I started running about a year ago, my friends got me into it and I've loved it," says MacDonald.

      Due to this love, Joanna Young came to this community run after finishing the Boston Marathon 40 minutes before the bombs went off last week. "I felt the whole experience of being in Boston and kind of being there the moment. It was really mind-blowing and life changing. Just to be able to come here and represent that small part of Boston and being part of the marathon," says Young.

      Liz Knickerbocker was out with Fleet Feet telling people how they could donate money to The One Fund which benefits those who need it most from the bombings. They were out to honor the running store only yards away from the bomb site who came to the aid of those who were injured from the attacks. "It just goes to show how much a running community is a family. Whenever there is a tragic event they all want to join together and help each other," says Knickerbocker.

      Much like a true marathon, everyone was helping each other to finally cross the finish line.