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      More triple-e evidence means more spraying

      <p> <font size="2">T</font> <font size="2" face="Arial"> <font size="2" face="Arial">here will be more spraying</font> </font> <font size="2">,</font> <font size="2" face="Arial"><font size="2" face="Arial">this time by trucks on the ground</font></font><font size="2"> </font><font size="2" face="Arial"><font size="2" face="Arial">to kill off mosquitoes carrying triple 'e'</font></font><font size="2" face="Arial"><font size="2" face="Arial"> virus.</font></font></p>

      These pesky mosquitoes are causing a lot more problems than just itchy bites.

      There's been one human case of triple 'E' this season. The person is recovering in the hospital.

      "It just brings it to the forefront even more. Its like okay, this isn't a joke. You really need to be serious about this," says Lorie Woznica of Cicero.

      N ow, O nondaga C ounty H ealth D epartment says more test pools have shown evidence of triple 'e' around C icero swamp.

      S o, they plan to keep spraying to ensure safety to the public. Lorie Woznica lives right across the swamp and she says every summer its always a concern.

      "A nd its just like a shock. Like its right here. Right here," says Woznica.

      W hile heath experts are saying this is something to take seriously, they don't want people to fear going outside.

      "They should be concerned. Don't get me wrong. B ut, they should also be making sure they know what they can do to protect themselves so they can go out and enjoy the nice weather that we have," says Kevin Zimmerman, Director of Environmental Health.

      Covering up with long pants and long sleeves along with bug spray is highly suggested. But, even with those layers of protection, there will be more spraying. But, this time with trucks.

      While there's been a lot of mixed feelings when it comes to aerial spraying for mosquitoes and now ground spraying, some others are saying, spray. They want to be protected.

      "Everybody doesn't like it, but for us that are even more bombarded because of the swamp. I would say go ahead," says Woznica.

      Whether its spraying in the air or on the ground, they plan on taking every precaution to make sure that no one else gets infected with the potentially deadly disease.