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      Neighbors in East Syracuse dig out from under storm damage

      Beth Snow in front of her house on McCool Avenue in East Syracuse.

      Throughout the day, people in the Village of East Syracuse have been cleaning up in the aftermath of Tuesday's devastating storm that resulted in a State of Emergency. The village took a direct hit; many streets became impassable as trees downed power lines and damaged homes.

      Beth Snow's home on McCool Avenue sustained minor damage after strong winds uprooted a large tree in front of her house. "The storm completely blew through and it was light rain. So we came outside and realized there was a giant tree on front lawn was now on our house." Snow explained.

      A delegation from the Governor's office showed up at East Syracuse Village Hall to assess the damage and decide whether the Governor should make a disaster declaration to qualify East Syracuse for financial aid.

      County Legislator and former East Syracuse Village Mayor Danny Liedka agrees that a formal disaster declaration would be in order.

      "These people are in a lot of trouble here. We need all the help we can get here in East Syracuse"

      National Grid says some 300 crews are working throughout its entire service area restoring power. In East Syracuse, some of the crews came from as far as Illinois and Ohio. As of 4:00 Wednesday afternoon, power had been restored to 800 customers in East Syracuse.

      A National Grid spokesman says power will be restored to remaining homes and businesses, but could not say exactly how long that may take.

      Just about everyone has a story to tell about the worst storm they can remember.

      Yasmine Prasad??s property was especially hard hit. "There was this huge boom and the next thing I knew the trees in the front and the back ...just gone... You couldn't see out the windows."

      As destructive as the storm was, apparently no one in East Syracuse was seriously hurt. According to Liedka, "From what I've heard no injuries and that is absolutely remarkable. I think everybody heeded the warnings modern technology got people in their basements and I think that really was the story of the day."