70
      Monday
      85 / 66
      Tuesday
      87 / 66
      Wednesday
      89 / 68

      Phase two of the Connective Corridor starts next week

      Connective Corridor

      R ight now cars are buzzing all around Armory Square, they keep it alive. However, next week the intersection where Fayette and West streets meet will se traffic cones start going up.

      Derek Andrews lives on Fayette Street. "It's definitely worth the end goal, it's just gonna be a pain up until that point," says Andrews.

      The Connective Corridor aims to connect the SU hill with the downtown area. It brings new scenery, bike lanes and sidewalks to a two mile stretch of Genesee, Fayette and Townsend Streets.

      Garrett Andrews goes to Syracuse University. "Since I go to SU, I see a lot of people who are almost trapped on the hill since underclassman aren't necessarily allowed to have cars, so getting people out and about exploring Syracuse would probably be good for them," says Andrews.

      Construction on this second phase is estimated to take a month or more per city block closing roads and altering sidewalks.

      Christopher Fagan works at Mullys in Armory Square. "The mall's already hurting us enough, so when you start shutting down streets it's only gonna hurt us more. It's hard enough to get people down here to begin with, let alone when there's construction," says Fagan.

      Some businesses want this construction to happen somewhere else, so they can avoid the possibility of losing out on customers.

      "There's always construction in Syracuse and when it's downtown where people like to go and hangout, it's only gonna make things worse," says Fagan.

      Other businesses on Fayette Street know their customers will keep coming in, even if it's inconvenient.

      Joel Shapiro is with Mr.. Shop in Syracuse. "People are still gonna come to all the stores they're gonna come to all the restaurants. Armory Square is still the most exciting place in the city of Syracuse. Even thought there will be some construction, last year we had streets torn up. People still came in to our stores, they figure it out," says Shapiro.

      Construction which aims to make Syracuse prosper and to continue keeping it alive.