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      Property tax hike is back on-Common Council overrides Mayor's veto

      The Syracuse Common Council has unanimously overturned Mayor Minerâ??s veto of their proposed property tax increase.

      That means Syracuse property owners will see a slight increase in their tax bill.

      Mayor Miner vetoed the proposed 1.5 percent hike, which would be about $12 more per year for property owners.

      The council says the tax increase will bring in about $500,000 in additional revenue for the city.

      The council hopes that revenue will go towards paving potholes and city streets, along with public safety.

      Syracuse City Councilor, Khalid Bey, says this was a decision he made on behalf of his constituents.

      "You always have to think about the people who vote you into office. Those are essentially the ones we provide for, the ones that we speak for," says Bey.

      Just in time for the hot Summer months, the ammendments also include a raise for city lifeguards. Syracuse City Councilor, Chad Michael Ryan says their salaries weren't competitive with suburban and private pools.

      "We cant get people to want to be lifeguards in the city because they can go anywhere and get paid more. So hopefully that will allow us to retain some lifeguards and get people to want to stay here and do that job," says Ryan.

      Out of all the budget amendments vetoed by the mayor, the only one that the city council did not override was an allocation of an additional $30,000 for west side senior services. Last summer, the city stopped renting space at a tax delinquent, west side banquet hall which was used as a senior center three days a week.

      However, Syracuse City Councilor Bob Dougherty is mindful that the final decision on spending lies with the mayor.

      "There's always the idea in the back of my mind that the mayor may not spend some of this money. It's up to her. It's her choice to spend it or not. So if it doesn't get spent that will basically be a surplus for next year," says Dougherty.