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      Sterling Renaissance Festival opens for the summer

      B ack in the fifteen hundreds, people lived a little bit differently than we do now in 2013. Organizers for the Sterling Renaissance Festival work for weeks in advance of this opening weekend to prepare their actors and vendors to make sure the festival is historically accurate.

      This gives people the best experience possible when they come, letting them come away with a bit of a history lesson too.

      Doug Waterbury owns the Festival. "No body's wearing earrings, at least not the common folks from that time period. No one's walking around with cell phones as an employee, it's extremely serious," says Waterbury.

      "It's fun and learning how people lived back then," says Colleen Lingenfelter who was out today with her daughter.

      Gary Izzo is the Creative Director in Sterling. "What we do here, it makes people think that they have a place that they belong," says Izzo. "It feeds the imagination somehow. Americans are very naturally enthralled with royalty and England and that kind of stuff for some reason."

      Whether it was watching a show or seeing a fancy costume, there is something here for everyone.

      "The hair braiding, seeing everyone dressed up and the queen and the jesters," says Noelle Shotwell who drove out from Buffalo.