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      Supreme Court keeps race in the college admissions process

      Affirmative action

      High atop the hill on Syracuse University's campus sits a statue of Abraham Lincoln. One of his guiding principles during his time in the white house was starting the path toward racial equality.

      Bob Marley of Syracuse knows what really counts today. "Whatever you work for you should get, I mean you follow your dream to the fullest, don't let nobody stop you then by all means no matter what color you is, you're gonna get it. That's called success at the end of the day. Other than that there's no other way to say it. No matter what color you is, it's all about what's up here," says Marley.

      Today the U.S. Supreme Court weighed in on the debate over Affirmative Action. It stems from the case of a white girl in Texas who says she was barred from entering the University of Texas in 2008, due to her race. This verdict will still allow race to be a determining factor in college admissions, but making it harder for schools to use the policies to achieve diversity.

      Veronika Espinoza goes to school at Cal St. San Marcos. "It should be based on your academics, because I mean it doesn't matter the race that you are. Grades are the most important when it comes to school, it should just be based on that," says Espinoza.

      Rahleek Thompson graduated from OCC in 2010. "Everybody should be offered the same opportunity, that's what it's built on isn't it? The land of opportunity, that's it... Affirmative action should not go no where in a school," says Thompson.

      A debate many are surprised we're still having so many years after Honest Abe put the country on a path toward racial equality.

      sits a statue of Abraham Lincoln. One of his guiding principles during his time in the white house was starting the path toward racial equality.