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      Syracuse Police shutdown website after hacking related to Bernie Fine case

      If you try to log on to the Syracuse Police website you will be redirected to an unrelated page because the department has dismantled the site after it was hacked into by the group Anonymous.

      In a rambling online post, the group identifies the reason it targeted the Syracuse Police. "And oh look Syracuse doesn't take abuse seriously, either. Tsk, tsk," a posting reads - a reference to the fact that former Syracuse Police Chief Dennis DuVal was told about the initial phone call that came into the department in the Bernie Fine sexual abuse case.

      S yracuse police will speak publicly about the hacking at 3 o'clock this afternoon. Syracuse Police spkoesperson Tom Connellan emphasizes that the website was a public website and hackers did not compromise the department's secure encrypted websites where confidential information is held. "There is no way to access public information or any records from the public website," Connellan said. "Those usernames and passwords were used by people inside the department to update the page - to make changes to events or to advertise an event, things like that," he added.

      Though the public website was shutdown yesterday, Connellan says there was no damage and they are in the process of making sure its secure with new passwords. Connellan says the department is working with the appropriate federal authorities to determine the people responsible for hacking the site.

      The hackers called their mission #OpPiggyBank. In a posting on they cite a story about the Syracuse Police investigation of the Bernie Fine scandal and declare judgement. They wrote, "Judgement: We Must Troll You". they go on to say:

        We are anonymous We are Legion We do not forgive We do not forget Expect us

      The group Anonymous says it is also responsible for the recent hacking of a police association in Texas and the Salt Lake City police department's website. The operation was called "Operation Piggy Bank."

      According to its website, Anonymous "provides the public with investigative reports exposing corrupt companies. Our team includes analysts, forensic accountants, statisticians, computer experts, and lawyers from various jurisdictions and backgrounds. All information presented in our reports is acquired through legal channels, fact-checked, and vetted thoroughly before release. This is both for the protection of our associates as well as groups/individuals who rely on our work."