WEATHER WATCH
CDC warns of possible heart condition after teens and young adults get second vaccine dose
Young adult getting vaccinated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a rare heart condition possibly linked to adolescents and young adults getting the vaccine, according to the COVID-19 Vaccine Safety Technical (VaST) Work Group at the CDC. (Getty Images)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a rare heart condition possibly linked to adolescents and young adults getting the vaccine, according to the COVID-19 Vaccine Safety Technical (VaST) Work Group at the CDC.

After a recent report last week, VaST concluded that there are relatively few reports of myocarditis, which can cause inflammation of the heart.

According to the report, it's occurring in males more than females and it is more often following dose number 2 of the vaccine.

Signs of myocarditis can be chest pain, shortness of breath both at resting and during physical activity, according to the University of Pennsylvania.

VaST reported the symptoms typically show within 4 days after the vaccination.

The agency also was quick to point out that this is relatively rare and the cases they have seen are mild and may not be related to the vaccine at all.

"There's no evidence that this condition is linked to the vaccine at this time," said Stanford University Global Health and Infectious Disease Professor Dr. Yvonne Maldonado. "And it's possible that these could be related to other underlying causes other viral infections or other causes."

Dr. Jana Shaw, Pediatric Infectious Disease Specialist at Upstate University Hospital, is urging patience while the CDC reviews the data. "We really need to be careful and not jump to the conclusion and assume that this is the vaccine doing it. We need more information," she said.

Dr. Shaw says, for now, she is hitting the pause button for her own child. "As a parent, my son just got vaccinated with the first dose as well and if I don't hear from CDC before his next dose is to be given I'm gonna just wait because I know it's safe to delay the second dose probably up to 6 weeks," she said.

Dr. Shaw says parents need to do a risk versus benefit analysis of getting the shot and talk to their child's doctor. "There are children who might be at increased risk for severe COVID and for that child, the risk of vaccination that might not even be there or might be really small does not outweigh the risk benefit of vaccination," Dr. Shaw said.

If you have any concerns that your son or daughter is affected by this, you should contact your family doctor.

This news comes as vaccines appear to be working and COVID-related deaths in the United States are at some of the lowest levels of the entire pandemic.

Click here for more information from VaST.

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