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"Baby, it's cold outside!" Christmas classic hitting a sour note

A classic holiday song from the 1940s is hitting a sour note at some radio stations across the nation.

A classic holiday song from the 1940s is hitting a sour note at some radio stations across the nation.

They have banned the song "Baby, It's Cold Outside," after the rise of the #MeToo movement.

The song is being reinterpreted by listeners who are hearing more than just an innocently flirtatious Christmas song.

The outcry stems from a larger cultural shift over what is considered acceptable.

"Somebody is expressing how they feel, and then this other person with more power is denying them that. That's not okay, and we shouldn't be OK with that," Tiffany Brec, with Vera House, said.

Bec said instead of banning the song it would be better to talk about it and let it lead to a larger conversation about sexual violence.

"We do have to pay attention to these smaller things, that don't at face value seem all that important because those small things start to add up and have a larger impact," Brec said.

Some say the song is harmless and about two people with affection toward one another flirting while the snow is falling outside.

"It doesn't make sense to me. Compared to some of the more modern Christmas songs, that one seems pretty harmless to me," Ben Allio of Syracuse, said.

So far, radio stations in California, Ohio, and Canada have stopped playing the song.

"It's the Dinosaur with the biggest hits on the planet! How you doing? It's the Caveman," Nick Caplin, DJ for the Dinosaur, said.

Radio DJ, Nick Caplin, the "Caveman" on the Dinosaur in Syracuse has been in the business for decades. When he listens to the song, he hears two people singing about wanting to stay out of the winter weather. He said many times only the song's writer knows what it is really about.

"It makes you want to sing in your car. Sing in the shower or whatever it is, and sometimes the meaning of that song is very far away from what you perceived it to be," Caplin said.

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